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A Model Clinic of Integrative Medicine: The UCLA Center for East-West Medicine Clinic

"By using Western medicine to look at the trees and Chinese medicine to look at the forest, we have a much more comprehensive view of health." Dr. Ka-Kit Hui


“By using Western medicine to look at the trees and Chinese medicine to look at the forest, we have a much more comprehensive view of health.”
Ka-Kit Hui, MD, FACP, Wallis Annenberg Professor in
Integrative East-West Medicine,
Founder and Director, UCLA Center for East-West Medicine

Blending Chinese and Western Medicine

The UCLA Center for East-West Medicine integrates the best of both modern Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine to provide healthcare that is safe, effective and affordable.

In general, Western medicine looks at parts of the body separately. It takes a micro approach, using medication and technology to treat disease and trauma. Chinese medicine seeks to maintain health and enhance the body’s natural resistance to disease. It takes a macro approach, focusing on wellness, self-healing and the interaction of mind and body.

Taken together, they form a comprehensive, integrative approach to health that addresses both specific problems and the patient as a whole. And because the physicians of the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine clinic have trained at some of the finest medical schools in the United States, as well as integrative medicine at the Center, they are exceptionally well-qualified to care for patients using this innovative approach.

How It Works

During the first office visit, a Center clinician will speak with the patient about his or her current symptoms, medical history and lifestyle. An initial exam that combines Western and Chinese diagnostic techniques will be performed.

The clinician will then design an individualized treatment plan. In addition to Western strategies, treatment may include Chinese medicine techniques such as:

  • Acupuncture
  • Acupressure: Using physical pressure, such as a finger or elbow, to stimulate specific acupuncture sites
  • Therapeutic massage
  • Nutritional and herbal counseling
  • Stress management and lifestyle recommendations
  • Qi-Gong and Tai-Chi: Mind-body exercises

 

Contact Information:
(310) 998-9118
www.cewm.med.ucla.edu


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