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Malcolm Taw, M.D. on Integrative East-West Cancer Care

April 5, 2013

On Monday, March 18, 2013, Dr. Malcolm Taw from the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine presented “Cancer Care and Wellness through Integrative East-West Medicine” in Westlake, sharing a brief introduction of Integrative Medicine followed by practical ways that cancer patients can improve various quality of life symptoms related to cancer and its treatment process.

According to Dr. Malcolm Taw, Assistant Clinical Professor of medicine at the UCLA Center for East-West Medicine, Integrative East-West medicine can optimize the quality of life for patients with cancer. The techniques can treat symptoms or side effects commonly associated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery, he said. A few of these side-effects include pain, nausea, fatigue, insomnia, peripheral neuropathy, vasomotor hot flashes, lymphedema, and anxiety.

Board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine in Oriental Medicine, Acupuncture and Chinese Herbology, Dr. Taw has treated patients with cancer, usually in collaboration with their oncologists and other health care providers, during different stages of the cancer process.

“Dr. Taw is unique in his experience of both East and West medicine,” said Tricia Lethcoe, a marriage and family therapist intern and program associate with the Cancer Support Community. Prior to the presentation, Lethcoe expressed hope that “Dr. Taw’s presentation [would] provide participants with information about different options for enhancing their current treatment,“ and that “participants [might] learn new ways to manage the different aspects of cancer treatment.”


To read the full article on Ventura County Star, click here.

The presentation was sponsored by the Young Adult Support Group, which meets from 7-8:30 p.m. on the first and third Mondays of each month at the Westlake Cancer Support Community. It is not a cancer-specific group, and all young adults are welcome to attend.


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